Profile photo for Brian Allen, Psy.D.

Brian Allen, Psy.D.

title

Associate Professor of Pediatrics and Psychiatry

Director of Mental Health Services, Center for the Protection of Children

Email

Phone

  717-531-4100

Office

Stine Foundation TLC Research and Treatment Center (Hershey/Harrisburg)

Brief Bio

Brian Allen, Psy.D.,is an associate professor of Pediatrics and Psychiatry at the Penn State College of Medicine and Director of Mental Health Services in the Center for the Protection of Children at the Penn State Children's Hospital. His research focuses on the developmental impact of childhood trauma and maltreatment, including the efficacy of mental health interventions in ameliorating that impact. More specifically, he investigates the role of attachment processes in post-maltreatment development and treatment outcome, the etiology and treatment of problematic sexual behavior in pre-teen children, and the dissemination and implementation of evidence-based treatments. He is responsible for directing the provision of clinical services at the Stine Foundation TLC Research and Treatment Center, an outpatient mental health program serving maltreated children and their families.


Education

2002, B.A., Psychology, Hillsdale College

2004, M.S., Clinical Psychology, Eastern Michigan University

2008, Psy.D., Clinical Psychology, Indiana University of Pennsylvania

2008, Internship, Clinical Psychology, CAARE Diagnostic and Treatment Center, UC Davis Children's Hospital

2009, Fellowship, National Center for Child Traumatic Stress, UCLA & Duke University


Expertise

child sexual abuse; child physical abuse; developmental sequelae of sexual and physical abuse; attachment theory; childhood problematic sexual behavior; trauma-focused cognitive-behavioral therapy; parent-child interaction therapy


Research Interests

mediators and moderators of treatment outcome; the role of attachment processes in development and treatment; problematic sexual behavior of preteen children; application of evidence-based treatments to understudied populations; historical context of child abuse