Who We Are


History

We are working to build a sustainable network of researchers and practitioners who will 

  1. produce new knowledge
  2. foster the design and evaluation of innovative approaches to the prevention, detection, and treatment of child maltreatment
  3. create interdisciplinary education opportunities and experiences for Penn State students, and
  4. put the products of these efforts to work in communities throughout Pennsylvania and beyond

Further, the Network works to serve as the University’s coordinating entity for the dissemination of relevant communications, public awareness, student engagement, and service pertaining to child protection and well-being information and initiatives.

Research

The Network's research efforts focus on the causes, prevention, detection, consequences, and treatment of child abuse and neglect. The Network is dedicated to improving the well­being of children, youth and families, while expanding Penn State’s internationally recognized expertise in research, practice and education.

We provide opportunities and support for collaborative and translational science in order to address the complex problems of child maltreatment. Our work covers the spectrum, ranging from research on child development and clinical treatments that foster child health to public policy that promotes child safety and well­being.

Education

Through undergraduate and graduate ­level coursework and with other educational opportunities for faculty, staff, students, and professionals, the Network strives to raise awareness and works to train the next generation of professionals. In addition, the Network facilitates events including an annual conference aimed at increasing awareness, disseminating cutting ­edge research, and supporting innovative programs.

Service

The Network aims to push the bounds of social and public policy through efficient translation of evidence­-based research. By partnering with community providers and public policy leaders at the local, state, and federal levels, the Network's goal is to raise public awareness about the scope and gravity of child maltreatment and to elevate this issue as worthy of significant public health investment. Countering child maltreatment is a community concern that requires community-wide efforts. We engage with a wide array of agencies and organizations to learn more about local needs and to contribute expertise that will lead to safe, healthful environments for all children.

Profile photo for Jennie G. Noll, Ph.D.

Jennie G. Noll, Ph.D.

title

Professor of Human Development and Family Studies

Director: Child Maltreatment Solutions Network 

Principal Investigator: NICHD P50 Capstone Center for Healthy Children

Email

Phone

  814-867-4751

Office

209 Health and Human Development Building

The Pennsylvania State University

University Park, PA 16802

Brief Bio

Jennie G. Noll, Ph.D., is a professor of Human Development and Family Studies, Director of the Child Maltreatment Solutions Network, and PI of the NICHD P50 Capstone Center for Healthy Children her primary research foci are the bio-psycho-social consequences of childhood sexual abuse, pathways to teen pregnancy and high-risk sexual behaviors for abused and neglected youth, the long-term adverse health outcomes for victims of sexual abuse, midlife reversibility of neurocognitive deficits in stress-exposed populations, and the propensity for abused and neglected teens to engage in high-risk internet and social media behaviors. Dr. Noll works with local, state, and federal policy makers to translate science into messages that impact child welfare policy and practice.


Education

1990, B.A., Psychology, University of Southern California

1995, Ph.D., Developmental Psychology/Statistical Methodology, University of Southern California


Expertise

child sexual abuse, longitudinal studies, research-to-policy, health consequences of abuse, teen pregnancy, sexual abuse prevention, developmental sequelae of sexual abuse over the lifecourse


Research Interests

internet and social media, sexual behaviors, intergenerational transmission, biological embedding, neurocognitive development, policy analysis, sex trafficking, prevention


Labs


Courses

HDFS 597

Grant Writing Seminar

HDFS 521

Child Maltreatment: Theory, Research, and Impact

Profile photo for Hannah M. C. Schreier, Ph.D.

Brief Bio

Dr. Schreier received training in health psychology and is currently an Assistant Professor of Biobehavioral Health at Penn State. Broadly speaking, she is interested in how experiences during childhood and adolescence shape long-term chronic disease risk. Her research focuses primarily on the impact of growing up in low socioeconomic environments, of different family-level influences, and of exposure to child maltreatment and how these influence metabolic and inflammatory markers of chronic disease risk in youth. She is also interested in exploring the potential role that social interventions may be able to play in actively improving physiological outcomes among at-risk youth.


Education

2006, B.A.Hon., Psychology, McGill University

2008, M.A., Health Psychology, The University of British Columbia

2012, Ph.D., Health Psychology, The University of British Columbia


Expertise

health disparities, child and adolescent health, immune, endocrine, and metabolic functioning


Research Interests

adolescent health and well-being, cardiovascular disease risk, inflammation, immune functioning, socioeconomic health disparities, sex trafficking, social interventions, family functioning


Labs


Courses

BBH 311

Interdisciplinary Integration of Biobehavioral Health Research

BBH 310

Research Methods

Profile photo for Sarah A. Font, Ph.D.

Brief Bio

My research seeks to understand the individual, familial, community, and system factors that promote or inhibit immediate and later life success among youth who experience maltreatment or foster care placement. Within this agenda, I have focused on three issues: (1) determinants of wellbeing among Child Protective Services (CPS)-involved and foster care youth; (2) implications of measurement for understanding causes and consequences of maltreatment and child welfare events; (3) the role of social disadvantage in child maltreatment.


Education

Postdoctoral fellow, 2016, University of Texas at Austin

Ph.D. in Social Welfare, 2014, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Master of Social Work, 2008, Western Michigan University

Bachelor of Social Work, 2007, Western Michigan University


Expertise

foster care, child welfare, child maltreatment, child protective services


Research Interests

care, child welfare, child maltreatment, child protective services


Courses

CRIM 597

Special Topics Seminar – Crimes Against Children

CMAS 258

Introduction to Child Maltreatment and Advocacy Studies

Profile photo for Yo Jackson, Ph.D., ABPP

Yo Jackson, Ph.D., ABPP

title

Professor of Psychology

Associate Director: Child Maltreatment Solutions Network

Email

Phone

  814-867-3244

Office

219 Moore Building

The Pennsylvania State University

University Park, PA 16802

Brief Bio

Yo Jackson is a Professor in the Clinical Child Psychology Program in the Psychology department at Penn State University and the Associate Director of the Child Maltreatment Solutions Network. Her research focuses on the mechanisms of resilience for youthexposed to trauma and developing models of the process from exposure to outcome for youth and families. She also studies intergenerational transmission of trauma and methods and measurement in child maltreatment research. She is a reviewer for numerous journals and serves as an Associate Editor for Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology and Professional Psychology: Research and Practice.


Education

Ph.D., Clinical Child Psychology, University of Alabama


Expertise

trauma assessment, nature and mechanisms of trauma impact on youth development, child maltreatment, foster care systems and foster care youth, evidence-based interventions, influence of cultural on mental health, program evaluation, competency development in clinical child psychology


Research Interests

mechanisms of resilience for youth exposed to trauma, intergenerational transmission of trauma, foster care youth and families, assessment of trauma and child maltreatment


Profile photo for Christian M. Connell, Ph.D.

Christian M. Connell, Ph.D.

title

Associate Professor of Human Development and Family Studies

Associate Director: Child Maltreatment Solutions Network

Email

Phone

  814-867-6467

Office

217 Health and Human Development Building

The Pennsylvania State University

University Park, PA 16802

Brief Bio

Christian M. Connell, Ph.D., is an Associate Professor of Human Development and Family Studies and a faculty member with the Child Maltreatment Solutions Network at Penn State University. Dr. Connell received his Ph.D. in Clinical-Community Psychology from the University of South Carolina and completed pre- and postdoctoral training in the Department of Psychiatry at Yale University School of Medicine. His research focuses on the experiences of youth who have been maltreated, as well as those who become involved in the child welfare system and other child-serving systems (e.g., mental health, juvenile justice). His research examines individual, family, and contextual risk and protective processes that impact child behavioral health and wellbeing following incidents of maltreatment or child welfare system contact, as well as community-based efforts to prevent or treat the negative effects of maltreatment and other traumatic experiences in children and adolescents. Dr. Connell’s research has been supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health, Administration for Children and Families, and State and local contracts.


Education

2001 Postdoctoral Fellowship, Department of Psychiatry, Yale School of Medicine

2000 Predoctoral Fellowship, Department of Psychiatry, Yale School of Medicine

2000 Ph.D., Clinical-Community Psychology, University of South Carolina

1993 B.S., Psychology, Pennsylvania State University


Expertise

child welfare outcomes, administrative data systems, community-based research methods, program and service system evaluation


Research Interests

individual, family, and contextual risk and protective processes that impact child behavioral health and wellbeing following incidents of maltreatment, child welfare system contact, or other traumatic experiences; evaluation of community-level evidence-informed efforts to prevent or treat the negative effects of maltreatment and other traumatic experiences in children and adolescents; use of administrative data systems to inform child welfare system practice and policy initiatives


Labs


Courses

CMAS 466

Community and System Response to Child Maltreatment

HDFS 503

Human Development Intervention: Analysis of Theories and Approaches

Profile photo for Brian Allen, Psy.D.

Brian Allen, Psy.D.

title

Associate Professor of Pediatrics and Psychiatry

Director of Mental Health Services, Center for the Protection of Children

Email

Phone

  717-531-4100

Office

Stine Foundation TLC Research and Treatment Center (Hershey/Harrisburg)

Brief Bio

Brian Allen, Psy.D.,is an associate professor of Pediatrics and Psychiatry at the Penn State College of Medicine and Director of Mental Health Services in the Center for the Protection of Children at the Penn State Children's Hospital. His research focuses on the developmental impact of childhood trauma and maltreatment, including the efficacy of mental health interventions in ameliorating that impact. More specifically, he investigates the role of attachment processes in post-maltreatment development and treatment outcome, the etiology and treatment of problematic sexual behavior in pre-teen children, and the dissemination and implementation of evidence-based treatments. He is responsible for directing the provision of clinical services at the Stine Foundation TLC Research and Treatment Center, an outpatient mental health program serving maltreated children and their families.


Education

2002, B.A., Psychology, Hillsdale College

2004, M.S., Clinical Psychology, Eastern Michigan University

2008, Psy.D., Clinical Psychology, Indiana University of Pennsylvania

2008, Internship, Clinical Psychology, CAARE Diagnostic and Treatment Center, UC Davis Children's Hospital

2009, Fellowship, National Center for Child Traumatic Stress, UCLA & Duke University


Expertise

child sexual abuse; child physical abuse; developmental sequelae of sexual and physical abuse; attachment theory; childhood problematic sexual behavior; trauma-focused cognitive-behavioral therapy; parent-child interaction therapy


Research Interests

mediators and moderators of treatment outcome; the role of attachment processes in development and treatment; problematic sexual behavior of preteen children; application of evidence-based treatments to understudied populations; historical context of child abuse


Profile photo for Christine Heim, Ph.D.

Brief Bio

Christine Heim, Ph.D., is Professor and Director of the Institute of Medical Psychology at Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin. Dr. Heim is also a Member of the Cluster of Excellence “Neurocure” at Charité in Berlin as well as Professor of Biobehavioral Health and Member of the Child Maltreatment Solutions Network at Penn State University. Dr. Heim’s research is focused on the neurobiological consequences of early-life trauma and their relationship to the development of depression, anxiety, and functional somatic disorders. The impact of her work is acknowledged in more than 14000 citations. She is the recipient of several honors and awards, including the 2015 Patricia Barchas Award in Sociophysiology of the American Psychosomatic Society. She is an elected member of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology. She is the recipient of multiple federal grants and foundation grants, and she serves on numerous national and international scientific review committees regarding research on the consequences of childhood trauma.


Education

 


Research Interests

multi-level, longitudinal approaches to integrating developmental and clinical data with functional and structural neuroimaging, endocrine and immune measures, and molecular genetics to elucidate the role of child maltreatment in the development of complex psychiatric and medical disorders


Profile photo for Kent Hymel, M.D.

Brief Bio

Dr. Kent P. Hymel completed his fellowship training in Child Abuse Pediatrics at The Children’s Hospital, Denver, Colorado in 1996. He has served as the U.S. Air Force Medical Consultant for Child Abuse, and has directed child abuse programs at Inova Fairfax Hospital for Children and at Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center. In 2014, Dr. Hymel joined the Center for the Protection of Children at Penn State Hershey Medical Center. He is a Professor of Pediatrics at the Penn State College of Medicine, a past member of the AAP’s Committee on Child Abuse and Neglect, a past President of the Ray E. Helfer Society—the professional society for child abuse physicians, and the Deputy Medical Editor of the Subboard in Child Abuse Pediatrics of the ABP. Dr. Hymel founded and directs the Pediatric Brain Injury Research Network, and is the Principle Investigator of an NIH-funded clinical trial testing the impact of a novel, PICU-based screening tool for pediatric abusive head trauma.


Education

1977, B.S., General Biology, University of Illinois

1980, M.D., Southern Illinois University School of Medicine

1983, General Pediatrics, Wilford Hall USAF Medical Center

1996, Child Abuse Pediatrics, The Children’s Hospital, Denver


Expertise

child abuse pediatrics


Research Interests

abusive head trauma, child abuse screening and predictive tools


Profile photo for Erika Lunkenheimer, Ph.D.

Erika Lunkenheimer, Ph.D.

title

Associate Professor of Psychology

Associate Director: Child Maltreatment Solutions Network

Email

Phone

  814-863-1991

Office

448 Moore Building

The Pennsylvania State University

University Park, PA 16802

Brief Bio

Dr. Lunkenheimer is an Associate Professor of Developmental Psychology and an Associate Director of the Child Maltreatment Solutions Network. Her research program revolves around risk and protective processes in the parent-child relationship, with the dual goals of (1) understanding how mother-child and father-child interactions and regulatory processes contribute to developmental psychopathology and (2) uncovering malleable relationship processes that aid in the tailoring and improvement of preventive intervention programs for families at risk, particularly risk for child maltreatment. This work is grounded in dynamic systems theory and dyadic and time series analytic methods, and has provided an understanding of parent-child biobehavioral coregulation in early childhood and its association with family risk.


Education

2006 Ph.D., Developmental Psychology, University of Michigan

1999 M.S., Marriage and Family Therapy, Northwestern University

1996 B.A., Psychology, Northwestern University


Expertise

parenting, parent-child interaction, self-regulation, child behavior problems, observational methods, dynamic systems theory and methods, developmental psychopathology


Research Interests

parent-child coregulation, parent and child self-regulation, parent mental health, stress physiology, autonomy support, harsh parenting, child maltreatment risk, maltreatment severity


Labs


Courses

PSYCH 212

 

PSYCH 547

Fundamentals of Social Development

CMAS 493

Child Maltreatment Minor Capstone Course

PSYCH 529

Maltreatment and Child Development

Profile photo for Sheridan Miyamoto, Ph.D.

Sheridan Miyamoto, Ph.D.

title

Assistant Professor, College of Nursing

Principal Investigator: DOJ/OVC Sexual Assault Forensic Examination Telehealth (SAFE-T) Center

Email

Phone

  814-863-4141

Office

315c Nursing Sciences Building

The Pennsylvania State University

University Park, PA 16802

Brief Bio

Sheridan Miyamoto is an Assistant Professor in the College of Nursing and the Child Maltreatment Solutions Network at Penn State University. Dr. Miyamoto received her Ph.D. in Nursing Science and Health-Care Leadership from the Betty Irene Moore School ofNursing at UC Davis. Her clinical work as a Nurse Practitioner at the UC Davis Child and Adolescent Abuse Resource and Evaluation Center focused on providing health and child maltreatment forensic services to children in Northern California. She supported six rural sites through live telehealth sexual assault consultations, allowing children to receive quality care within their own community. Miyamoto’s research interests include utilizing administrative databases to improve risk tools to identify childrenat risk of maltreatment, identification and prevention of commercial sexual exploitation of children (trafficking), the use of telehealth technology to improve sexual assault forensic care in rural communities, and the use of technology and innovation to improve patient outcomes. Miyamoto is the principal investigator of the Pennsylvania Sexual Assault Forensic Examination Telehealth (SAFE-T) Center, a project funded by the Department of Justice to enhance access to quality forensic services in underserved communities.


Education

2014 University of California Davis, Davis, CA

Doctorate of Philosophy, Nursing Science and Health Care Leadership

Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing

 

1996 Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN

Master of Science, Nursing

Family Nurse Practitioner Program

 

1994 University of California Davis, Davis, CA

Bachelor of Arts, Psychology


Expertise

child sexual abuse, sexual assault, telehealth, telemedicine, forensic nursing, child maltreatment, commercial sexual exploitation of children


Research Interests

sexual assault, sexual abuse, telehealth, mhealth, commercial sexual exploitation of children


Labs


Courses

CMAS 466

Community and System Response to Child Maltreatment

Profile photo for Carlomagno Panlilio, Ph.D.

Brief Bio

Carlomagno C. Panlilio, Ph.D. is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology, Counseling, and Special Education and a faculty member with the Child Maltreatment Solutions Network at the Pennsylvania State University. The overarching goal of Dr. Panlilio’s program of research is to understand the dynamic interplay between maltreatment, context, and development, and how these processes influence individual differences in learning. His research is guided by an interdisciplinary approach that draws from Developmental Science, Educational Psychology, Statistics, and Social Welfare to examine the multisystemic influences on early adversity and children’s development and learningover time. More specifically, he is interested in further explicating self-regulation and self-regulated learning as key developmental and learning processes that explain variability in the academic outcomes of children with a history of maltreatment.


Education

2000, B.A., Psychology, California State University Long Beach

2005, M.S., Family Studies, University of Maryland College Park

2015, Ph.D., Human Development, University of Maryland College Park


Expertise

child abuse and neglect, self-regulation, maltreatment and learning processes, academic competence, trauma-informed classrooms, dynamic and person-centered methodologies


Research Interests

practice and policy implications of child maltreatment, self-regulation, school readiness & academic achievement, parenting and family processes in at-risk environments, student-teacher relationship, maltreatment and learning processes


Courses

EDPSY 010

Individual Differences and Education

EDPSY 101

Analysis and Interpretation of Statistical Data in Education

CMAS 493

Child Maltreatment and Advocacy Studies Capstone Experience

EDPSY 521

Learning and Cognition

Profile photo for Idan Shalev, Ph.D.

Idan Shalev, Ph.D.

title

Assistant Professor of Biobehavioral Health

Mark T. Greenberg Early Career Professor for the Study of Children's Health and Development

Email

Phone

  814-865-5764

Office

223 Biobehavioral Health Building

The Pennsylvania State University

University Park, PA 16802

Brief Bio

Shalev’s research entails an interdisciplinary approach to identify mechanisms underpinning the biological embedding of stress across the lifespan. His research combines the disciplines of molecular genetics, endocrinology, neurobiology and psychology. This systems approach integrates data sources across multiple levels of genomic, biomarkers and phenotypic data. Specifically, using innovative research designs, his research tests the effects of stress from early life on change in telomere length and other biomarkers of aging across the life course, and the consequences of change in telomere length for physical and mental health problems. In the first study of children, Shalev and colleagues showed that cumulative violence exposure was associated with accelerated telomere erosion, from age 5 to age 10 years, for children who experienced violence at a young age. This finding provided initial support for a mechanism linking cumulative childhood stress to telomere maintenance, observed already at a young age, with potential impact for life-long health. Shalev is the Mark T. Greenberg Early Career Professor for the Study of Children's Health and Development and an author of more than 50 scientific articles and chapters.


Education

2004, B.Sc., Natural Sciences, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Israel 

2007, M.Sc., Neurobiology, Hebrew University, Jerusalem, Israel

2010, Ph.D., Genetics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem, Israel

2013, Postdoctoral, Psychology and Neuroscience, Duke University


Expertise

stress biology, telomere science, genomics, biological embedding, biological aging, biomarkers, evolutionary theories of aging, experimental designs


Research Interests

stress biology, aging, telomeres, genomics


Labs


Courses

BBH 497

Special Topics Seminar - Biobehavioral Aspects of Aging 

BBH 432

Biobehavioral Aspects of Stress

Profile photo for Chad Shenk, Ph.D.

Brief Bio

Chad Shenk, Ph.D., is an Associate Professor in the Departments of Human Development & Family Studies and Pediatrics at Penn State. He is also a licensed clinical psychologist with specialty training in pediatrics and trauma exposure and actively sees patients exposed to child maltreatment through Penn State’s Department of Pediatrics. Dr. Shenk’s basic science research examines the longitudinal pathways linking child maltreatment to the onset of adverse health outcomes across the lifespan. This work identifies risk mechanisms of various health conditions in the child maltreatment population using a multiple levels of analysis approach. His clinical trials and translational research therefore centers on the optimization of treatments applied following exposure to child maltreatment by targeting identified risk mechanisms more directly and effectively.


Education

2010 Postdoctoral Fellow, Child Maltreatment, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center

2007 Doctor of Philosophy/Master of Arts, Clinical Psychology, University of Nevada, Reno

2007 Predoctoral Intern, Child Clinical Psychology, University of Rochester Medical Center

1998 Bachelor of Arts, Psychology, The Pennsylvania State University


Expertise

assessment of pediatric trauma; prospective cohort and clinical trials methodology; long-term health consequences of child maltreatment; etiology and treatment of psychiatric disorders following child trauma exposure


Research Interests

improving methods of risk estimation in child maltreatment research; biological embedding of child maltreatment; identification of transdiagnostic mechanisms across multiple levels of analysis; optimization of preventive and clinical interventions for child trauma


Courses

CMAS 465

Child Maltreatment: Prevention and Treatment

CMAS 258

Introduction to Child Maltreatment and Advocacy Studies

HDFS 521

Child Maltreatment: Theory, Research, and Impact

Profile photo for Jennie G. Noll, Ph.D.

Jennie G. Noll, Ph.D.

title

Professor of Human Development and Family Studies

Director: Child Maltreatment Solutions Network 

Principal Investigator: NICHD P50 Capstone Center for Healthy Children

Email

Phone

  814-867-4751

Office

209 Health and Human Development Building

The Pennsylvania State University

University Park, PA 16802

Brief Bio

Jennie G. Noll, Ph.D., is a professor of Human Development and Family Studies, Director of the Child Maltreatment Solutions Network, and PI of the NICHD P50 Capstone Center for Healthy Children her primary research foci are the bio-psycho-social consequences of childhood sexual abuse, pathways to teen pregnancy and high-risk sexual behaviors for abused and neglected youth, the long-term adverse health outcomes for victims of sexual abuse, midlife reversibility of neurocognitive deficits in stress-exposed populations, and the propensity for abused and neglected teens to engage in high-risk internet and social media behaviors. Dr. Noll works with local, state, and federal policy makers to translate science into messages that impact child welfare policy and practice.


Education

1990, B.A., Psychology, University of Southern California

1995, Ph.D., Developmental Psychology/Statistical Methodology, University of Southern California


Expertise

child sexual abuse, longitudinal studies, research-to-policy, health consequences of abuse, teen pregnancy, sexual abuse prevention, developmental sequelae of sexual abuse over the lifecourse


Research Interests

internet and social media, sexual behaviors, intergenerational transmission, biological embedding, neurocognitive development, policy analysis, sex trafficking, prevention


Labs


Courses

HDFS 597

Grant Writing Seminar

HDFS 521

Child Maltreatment: Theory, Research, and Impact

Profile photo for Sandee Kyler, M.S.

Sandee Kyler, M.S.

title

Assistant Director, Child Maltreatment Solutions Network

Email

Phone

  814-867-4061

Office

202 Henderson Building

Brief Bio

Sandee is currently directing the programing efforts for the Network on Child Protection and Well-Being. She does this by designing awareness events, advancing educational opportunities for undergraduate students and community members, and promoting translational messages of the scientific endeavors of Network faculty. Sandee has worked at Penn State since 1997, formerly serving as the Lead Dissemination and Implementation Scientist at the Clearinghouse for Military Family Readiness. At Penn State, she provided proactive technical assistance to communities and military personnel implementing evidence-based programs. Specifically, Ms. Kyler has translated and disseminated research to communities, provided education and training, conducted research on support and services provided to military families after the sudden loss of a loved one, as well as identifying and helping to secure resources to enhance program implementation, implementation quality, program impact, assessment, and sustainability.


Profile photo for Yo Jackson, Ph.D., ABPP

Yo Jackson, Ph.D., ABPP

title

Professor of Psychology

Associate Director: Child Maltreatment Solutions Network

Email

Phone

  814-867-3244

Office

219 Moore Building

The Pennsylvania State University

University Park, PA 16802

Brief Bio

Yo Jackson is a Professor in the Clinical Child Psychology Program in the Psychology department at Penn State University and the Associate Director of the Child Maltreatment Solutions Network. Her research focuses on the mechanisms of resilience for youthexposed to trauma and developing models of the process from exposure to outcome for youth and families. She also studies intergenerational transmission of trauma and methods and measurement in child maltreatment research. She is a reviewer for numerous journals and serves as an Associate Editor for Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology and Professional Psychology: Research and Practice.


Education

Ph.D., Clinical Child Psychology, University of Alabama


Expertise

trauma assessment, nature and mechanisms of trauma impact on youth development, child maltreatment, foster care systems and foster care youth, evidence-based interventions, influence of cultural on mental health, program evaluation, competency development in clinical child psychology


Research Interests

mechanisms of resilience for youth exposed to trauma, intergenerational transmission of trauma, foster care youth and families, assessment of trauma and child maltreatment


Profile photo for Christian M. Connell, Ph.D.

Christian M. Connell, Ph.D.

title

Associate Professor of Human Development and Family Studies

Associate Director: Child Maltreatment Solutions Network

Email

Phone

  814-867-6467

Office

217 Health and Human Development Building

The Pennsylvania State University

University Park, PA 16802

Brief Bio

Christian M. Connell, Ph.D., is an Associate Professor of Human Development and Family Studies and a faculty member with the Child Maltreatment Solutions Network at Penn State University. Dr. Connell received his Ph.D. in Clinical-Community Psychology from the University of South Carolina and completed pre- and postdoctoral training in the Department of Psychiatry at Yale University School of Medicine. His research focuses on the experiences of youth who have been maltreated, as well as those who become involved in the child welfare system and other child-serving systems (e.g., mental health, juvenile justice). His research examines individual, family, and contextual risk and protective processes that impact child behavioral health and wellbeing following incidents of maltreatment or child welfare system contact, as well as community-based efforts to prevent or treat the negative effects of maltreatment and other traumatic experiences in children and adolescents. Dr. Connell’s research has been supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health, Administration for Children and Families, and State and local contracts.


Education

2001 Postdoctoral Fellowship, Department of Psychiatry, Yale School of Medicine

2000 Predoctoral Fellowship, Department of Psychiatry, Yale School of Medicine

2000 Ph.D., Clinical-Community Psychology, University of South Carolina

1993 B.S., Psychology, Pennsylvania State University


Expertise

child welfare outcomes, administrative data systems, community-based research methods, program and service system evaluation


Research Interests

individual, family, and contextual risk and protective processes that impact child behavioral health and wellbeing following incidents of maltreatment, child welfare system contact, or other traumatic experiences; evaluation of community-level evidence-informed efforts to prevent or treat the negative effects of maltreatment and other traumatic experiences in children and adolescents; use of administrative data systems to inform child welfare system practice and policy initiatives


Labs


Courses

CMAS 466

Community and System Response to Child Maltreatment

HDFS 503

Human Development Intervention: Analysis of Theories and Approaches

Profile photo for Jenelle Shanley, Ph.D.

Jenelle Shanley, Ph.D.

title

Research Associate faculty, Social Science Research Institute

Email

Phone

  814-865-8171

Office

202 Henderson Building

Brief Bio

Jenelle Shanley, Ph.D., is a Research Associate faculty in the Social Science Research Institute at Penn State University. Dr. Shanley completed her PhD in Clinical Psychology at Central Michigan University and her postdoctoral training at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center. Dr. Shanley’s research focuses on improving implementation of evidence-based parenting training programs for families with young children to reduce barriers to access and engagement. She has extensive experience of national and international dissemination efforts to implement two parent training programs, Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) and SafeCare. Dr. Shanley also has significant experience in developing, revising and adapting parent training curricula both for domestic and international implementations.


Education

 


Profile photo for Erika Lunkenheimer, Ph.D.

Erika Lunkenheimer, Ph.D.

title

Associate Professor of Psychology

Associate Director: Child Maltreatment Solutions Network

Email

Phone

  814-863-1991

Office

448 Moore Building

The Pennsylvania State University

University Park, PA 16802

Brief Bio

Dr. Lunkenheimer is an Associate Professor of Developmental Psychology and an Associate Director of the Child Maltreatment Solutions Network. Her research program revolves around risk and protective processes in the parent-child relationship, with the dual goals of (1) understanding how mother-child and father-child interactions and regulatory processes contribute to developmental psychopathology and (2) uncovering malleable relationship processes that aid in the tailoring and improvement of preventive intervention programs for families at risk, particularly risk for child maltreatment. This work is grounded in dynamic systems theory and dyadic and time series analytic methods, and has provided an understanding of parent-child biobehavioral coregulation in early childhood and its association with family risk.


Education

2006 Ph.D., Developmental Psychology, University of Michigan

1999 M.S., Marriage and Family Therapy, Northwestern University

1996 B.A., Psychology, Northwestern University


Expertise

parenting, parent-child interaction, self-regulation, child behavior problems, observational methods, dynamic systems theory and methods, developmental psychopathology


Research Interests

parent-child coregulation, parent and child self-regulation, parent mental health, stress physiology, autonomy support, harsh parenting, child maltreatment risk, maltreatment severity


Labs


Courses

PSYCH 212

 

PSYCH 547

Fundamentals of Social Development

CMAS 493

Child Maltreatment Minor Capstone Course

PSYCH 529

Maltreatment and Child Development

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